All Posts By

Jared Korver, CPA, CFP®

Is Now The Right Time to Invest That Cash?

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When I got to the office on Monday, the market had just had an awful seven-day period that looked something like this: The Vanguard Total Market Index was down nearly 13% in about the same amount of time it takes my four year old to find and put on his shoes, and of all Geoff’s great suggestions from last week’s brief, one had begun to stick out in my mind Monday morning: “Make a plan to put cash to work.“ One of the more interesting (and common) questions in investing revolves around the most prudent way to deploy cash that

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Money for the Two Halves of Life

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“One cannot live the afternoon of life according to the program of life’s morning; for what was great in the morning will be of little importance in the evening, and what in the morning was true will at evening become a lie.“ Carl Jung said that. The famous Swiss psychologist and psychoanalyst was referring to what he called “the two halves of life.” And while this is by no means a blog devoted to Jungian psychology, I think Jung’s two halves of life ring true and can have a massive impact on the ways we spend, save, and give money

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Is Tesla The Next Big Thing?

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Look, first off, I don’t know. And secondly, if you’ve been around us very long at Beacon you know that we are not stock pickers and will never be stock pickers, for reasons that we have laid out many, many times. The title of this blog is meant to be slightly tongue-in-cheek (because Tesla is not exactly “next” anymore) and click-baity (because everyone has an opinion about Tesla). But still! Tesla–a company that as of earlier this week had roughly the same market cap as Ford and GM combined–offers a rich ground for exploration into investing questions, and the question

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A House Divided

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If it is not clear to you, in 2019, that humans are tribal creatures, then I would suggest you tour an elementary school, which I have done twice in the last two days on behalf of our rising-kindergartner. These people are tribal! They gather into enclaves, and the enclaves form similar opinions on issues and ask the same sorts of questions as the other people in their group, and even start to dress the same. Of course I am talking about the touring parents of prospective kindergartners, but I suppose even the kids themselves show tribal tendencies at the ripe age of

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Running, money, and the importance of practice.

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When I was a freshman in high school, someone convinced me it would be a good idea to run cross country as a way to get in shape for basketball season. Looking back I don’t believe that was particularly good advice, since there is very little overlap between “cross country shape” and “basketball shape,” but I ran anyway, and it was “fun.” I was not very good at running 3.1 miles in a row at anything approaching a fast clip, and I mostly hated the actual running part, yet I found the whole experience of being on that team to

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This Is Your Brain On (Financial) Drugs

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In 1987, The Partnership for a Drug Free America released one of the most famous commercials in TV history, featuring an egg in a frying pan and the dramatic line: “This is your brain on drugs.” Like most ad campaigns of this genre it didn’t actually prove to be effective at curbing drug usage—and in some cases may have even done the opposite—so don’t worry, I’m not advocating for a money-themed version to be released. (If I did, though, I would probably just show footage of a toddler going through the various stages of a sugar high and subsequent crash.) 

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How to Rescue a Pet and Your Finances

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What would it take for your finances to get better? I mean, you have a life, I have a life (although my friends may object…), we’re all going around doing more or less the best we can, and at every turn we are confronted with decisions that fall at the intersection of money, time, debt, values, priorities, hobbies, and people. Nothing is simple. We know we can do better, that the ways in which our finances interact with the rest of our lives could be healthier, but what would it take? In 2012, if you were a stray dog or

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Is Sharing for Adults, Too?

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My wife Amy and I have two sons–Miles and Charlie–who are four years old and almost two years old, respectively. Do you know what one character trait we spend the most energy and time attempting to teach them? Of course you do! It’s sharing. Share the Legos. Give your brother a turn with that truck. Let that kid use the swing now. Pass the ball. We parents (and teachers, and coaches, and camp counselors, etc.) must be ever vigilant, for the children are constantly tempted to do anything but share. This is all well and good, but sometime in the

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A Crummy Commercial!

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The New York Times ran an article a couple of weeks ago entitled “How E-Commerce Sites Manipulate You Into Buying Things You May Not Want,” which was full of the sort of depressing and sometimes disturbing data privacy-related information that you may have grown accustomed to of late. Modern capitalism is many things, and one of those things is an incredibly efficient if not altogether wise machine to get us to buy a bunch of junk we don’t need and then turn around and buy some more tomorrow. At any rate, I had two immediate, visceral reactions to the article.

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Do you need a million dollars to retire?

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“The greatest show on television is Survivor,” is an opinion I hold dearly and would be happy to share with you, but anyway here’s an interesting tidbit about the game: Since the year 2000 when the show debuted in the U.S., the prize for the winner has not budged from it’s original amount of $1 million. For nineteen years and thirty-eight seasons it’s held steady, and I’d be shocked if it changed any time soon. (Just for reference, if you assume inflation of 2.5% over the last 19 years, the prize today would need to be about $1.6 million dollars to

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